Monday, March 31, 2008

CLHA Vol. 2: The Long Nineteenth Century

The second of the three volumes in the new Cambridge History of Law in America, edited by Christopher Tomlins and Michael Grossberg is titled "The Long Nineteenth Century (1789–1920)."

It deals with the formation and development of the American state system, the establishment and growth of systematic legal education, the spread of the legal profession, the growing density of legal institutions and their interaction with political and social action, and the development of the modern criminal justice system. We also see how law intertwines with religion, how it becomes ingrained in popular culture, and how it intersects with the worlds of the American military and of international relations.

More on the project as a whole and information about Volume 1 is here. There is a preview chapter for Volume 1, but not for Volume 2.

Contents, Volume 2
1. Law and the American state, from the Revolution to the Civil War: institutional growth and structural change Mark R. Wilson

2. Legal education and legal thought, 1790–1920 Hugh C. MacGill and R. Kent Newmyer

3. The legal profession: from the Revolution to the Civil War Alfred S. Konefsky

4. The courts, 1790–1920 Kermit L. Hall

5. Criminal justice in the United States, 1790–1920: a government of laws or men? Elizabeth Dale

6. Citizenship and immigration law, 1800–1924: resolutions of membership and territory Kunal M. Parker

7. Federal policy, Western movement and consequences for indigenous people, 1790–1920 David E. Wilkins

8. Marriage and domestic relations Norma Basch

9. Slavery, antislavery, and the coming of the Civil War Ariela Gross

10. Law, personhood and citizenship in the long nineteenth century: the borders of belonging Barbara Young Welke

11. Law in popular culture, 1790–1920: the people and the law Nan Goodman

12. Law and religion, 1790–1920 Sarah Barringer Gordon

13. Legal innovation and market capitalism, 1790–1920 Tony A. Freyer

14. Innovations in law and technology, 1790–1920 B. Zorina Khan

15. The laws of industrial organization, 1870–1920 Karen Orren

16. The military in American legal history Jonathan Lurie

17. The United States and international affairs, 1789–1919 Eileen P. Scully

18. Politics, state building, and the courts, 1870–1920 William E. Forbath.

1 comment:

  1. Mary--I'm really looking forward to reading this volume. The essays look fabulous.

    I'm intrigued by the organization. What do you think about the organization around the long nineteenth century? American legal history is usually broken around the Civil War. Do you think that traditional break obscures continuities that we should be focusing on? I expect the volume addresses this. I wonder if this will cause a major rethinking of legal history?

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