Thursday, September 3, 2009

NYU Legal History Colloquium

NYU's Legal History Colloquium is already underway. Here's the fall line-up:

August 26, 2009
William E. Nelson, Weinfeld Professor of Law, New York University School of Law
"Politicizing the Courts and Destroying the Law: A Legal History of Colonial North Carolina, 1660-1775"

September 2, 2009
William E. Nelson, Weinfeld Professor of Law, New York University School of Law
"Legal Chaos in a Factious Colony: New York, 1626-1776"

September 16, 2009
Prof. David Bernstein, George Mason University School of Law
"Rehabilitating Lochner - Part I"

September 23, 2009
Prof. David Bernstein, George Mason University School of Law
"Rehabilitating Lochner - Part II"

September 30, 2009
Laura Weinrib, Samuel I. Golieb Fellow 2009-2010, NYU School of Law
"Lawyers, Libertines and the Reinvention of Free Speech, 1920-1933"

October 7, 2009
Sara McDougall, Samuel I. Golieb Fellow 2009-2010, NYU School of Law
"Bigamy: A Male Crime in Medieval Europe?"

October 14, 2009
Maribel Morey, Princeton University, History Department
"The Making of 'An American Dilemma': The Carnegie Corporation President's Decision to Fund a Negro Study, 1923-1937"

October 21, 2009
Prof. Daniel J. Sharfstein, Vanderbilt University School of Law
"TBA"

October 28, 2009
Prof. Robert Kaczorowski, Fordham University School of Law
"A History of Fordham Law School"

November 4, 2009
Prof. Liam O'Melinn, Ohio Northern University College of Law
"TBA"

November 11, 2009
Prof. Troy McKenzie, New York University School of Law
"TBA"

November 18, 2009
Jedidiah Kroncke, Samuel I. Golieb Fellow 2009-2010, NYU School of Law
"The Birth of the Modern US Legal Exceptionalism: China, Legal Science, and Missionaries in the Early 20th Century"

November 25, 2009
Philip Akerman-Lieberman, Vanderbilt University
"TBA"

December 2, 2009
Christopher Beauchamp
"TBA"

Image credit: ATL

2 comments:

  1. Are these open to the public? I could not find any information on NYU's website.

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  2. Ms. Schiller, please try contacting one of the organizers directly. Their email addresses are under the faculty tab of NYU Law's website.

    It's a good question, because many university-based workshops and colloquia are meant to be fora for people who are already conversant in particular debates and literatures. Even scholars who are committed to addressing general audiences find it useful to have some settings in which they can test out ideas with disciplinary insiders. Even then, however, organizers often permit others to attend on a case-by-case basis. I'm not sure how the NYU folks view solloquium, and I shouldn't speak for them if I did.

    ReplyDelete