Monday, March 28, 2011

Program for Michigan Conference on Race, Law, and History in the Americas

The Program is now available for We Must First Take Account: A Conference on Race, Law, and History in the Americas, April 1-2, 2011, at the University of Michigan. The conference is sponsored by the University of Michigan Law School, the Legal History Consortium (Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, and Penn law schools), and the American Society for Legal History.

FRIDAY, APRIL 1
The William L. Clements Library, 909 S. University Avenue

Welcome
2:00-2:15 p.m.
Martha S. Jones, University of Michigan, Law School, Department of History & Center for Afroamerican and African Studies

Panel 1: Slavery
2:15-3:45 p.m.
Chair, Martha S. Jones, University of Michigan, Law School, Department of History & Center for Afroamerican and African Studies
Sarah Levine-Gronningsater
, University of Chicago, Department of History
Black Children and the Law: Race, Age, and Freedom in New York, 1799-1841
Graham T. Nessler
, University of Michigan, Department of History
The Shame of the Nation: The Force of Re-Enslavement and the Law of Slavery under the Regime of Jean-Louis Ferrand in Santo Domingo, 1804-1809
Michael A. Schoeppner
, University of Florida, Department of History
Quarantine and Race in the Antebellum South
Comment:
Daniel W. Hamilton
, University of Illinois, College of Law
Edlie L. Wong, University of Maryland, Department of English
Keynote Address
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Sherrilyn Ifill
, Professor of Law, University of Maryland School of Law
Re-imagining Reparations


Welcome Reception

5:00-6:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 2
University of Michigan Law School, 132 Hutchins Hall

Panel 2: The Body
9:00-10:30 a.m.
Chair, Richard Ross, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of History & College of Law
Silvia Capanema P. de Almeida
, Universite Paris 13-Nord
Counting the Colors: A Study of the Racial Classifications and Racism in the Early 20th Brazilian Navy
Michelle A. McKinley
, University of Oregon School of Law
The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Black): Legal and Cultural Constructions of Race and Nation in Colonial Latin America
Tera Agyepong
, Northwestern University Department of African American Studies & School of Law
The Most Vicious and Depraved: The Construction of African American Girls at the Illinois State Industrial School for Girls & Their Exclusion from the Rehabilitative Ideal
Comment:
Sueann Caulfield
, University of Michigan, Department of History, Residential College, & Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program
Susanna Blumenthal, University of Minnesota Law School & Department of History
Panel 3: Belonging
10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Chair, Jelani Jefferson Exum, University of Michigan Law School
Allison Gorsuch
, Yale University, Department of History
Before Dred Scott: Citizenship in the Midwestern Territories
Gwen Jordan
, University of Illinois-Springfield, Department of Legal Studies
Reconsidering Passing at the Intersection of Racial and Sexist Oppression: The Story of Ida Platt, Esquire 1863-1928
Beth Kressel
, University of Michigan Law School
Creating a Community of Equal Public Rights Activists in Reconstruction-era New Orleans
Comment:
Rebecca J. Scott
, University of Michigan, Department of History & Law School
Barbara Y. Welke, University of Minnesota, Department of History & Law School
Lunch Plenary
12:30-2:00 p.m.
Juan Perea, Cone, Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri & Roth Professor of Law, University of Florida Levin College of Law
Searching for Hercules

Panel 4: Civil Rights
2:15-3:45 p.m.
Sherie Randolph, University of Michigan, Department of History and Center for Afroamerican and African Studies
Millington Bergeson-Lockwood
, University of Michigan, Department of History
Resisting the Right to Exclude: African Americans and the Regulation of Public Accommodation in Boston, Massachusetts, 1865-1885
Megan Ming Francis
, Pepperdine University, Department of Political Science
The NAACP, Mob Violence, and the Unexpected Breakthrough in Constitutional Law
Nicole Frisone
, University of Minnesota, Department of History
Designing the Modern Community: Morris Milgram and Quota Driven Integration in Housing
Comment:
Matt Lassiter
, University of Michigan, Department of History
Christopher Schmidt, Chicago-Kent College of Law & The American Bar Foundation
Panel 5: Borders
4:00-5:30 p.m.
Chair, Anthony Mora, University of Michigan Department of History & Program in American Culture
Kristina M. Campbell
, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law
Rising Arizona: The Legacy of the Jim Crow Southwest on Modern Immigration Law and Policy
H. Timothy Lovelace Jr.
, University of Virginia, Department of History & School of Law
Fair Play for William Worthy: Cuba, Human Rights, and Worthy v. United States
Chantel Rodriguez
, University of Minnesota, Department of History
The Politics of Health and Citizenship in the Railroad Bracero Program: Mexican Railroad Guest Workers Claims to Workplace Safety Rights, 1942-1947
Comment:
Kif Augustine-Adams
, Brigham Young University Law School
William J. Novak, University of Michigan Law School
For additional information about the Program in Race, Law & History at the University of Michigan Law School visit the website.

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