Saturday, January 21, 2017

Weekend Roundup

  • Call for Applications: the 2017 Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research at the Woodrow Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program.  "The Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research (SICAR) is a multi-day seminar in which Ph.D. students receive training in conducting archival research from world-class faculty, researchers, archivists, and publishers. Although archival research is an integral part of many academic disciplines, it is virtually never taught at the graduate level. SICAR fills this critical gap in graduate education."
  • Hat tip to @LHR_editor for retweeting this Guide to 19th Century Legal Documents, prepared by the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Project of the Kentucky Historical Society to explain  the parts of typical documents, their function, and where they tend to appear “within the CWGK corpus.”
  • Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago, is to deliver the 2017 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities on “Powerlessness and the Politics of Blame."
  • The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum and the Mid-Hudson Antislavery History Project -- in commemoration of African American History Month -- will present "An American Paradox: Enslavement on the Hudson" with Associate Director of Content Development at Historic Hudson Valley Michael A. Lord on Thursday, February 2, 2017. The program will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Henry A. Wallace Visitor and Education Center. This event is free and open to the public.”   More.
  • Update: A fun fact from Mark Tushnet: "For more than 125 years, the Senate has not confirmed a Supreme Court nominee chosen by a president who lost the popular vote."  More.
Weekend Roundup is a weekly feature compiled by all the Legal History bloggers.

1 comment:

Shag from Brookline said...

At the NYTimes online today in its Book Section there is this:

"We’ve Been Here Before: Jon Meacham on the Literature of Our Discontent"

a propos the Inauguration of President Trump. Meacham uses novels to make his point, focusing on Hoover/FDR times.