Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Remember the Alamo (Bar Association)!

In honor of Senator Ted Cruz's last stand, we note that Dylan O. Drummond, K&L Gates LLP; Squire Patton Boggs LLP, has posted The Toughest Bar in Texas: The Alamo Bar Association, which appeared in The Appellate Advocate 27 (2015):
You can’t buy a drink in or even visit the toughest bar in Texas. That’s because it was never formally established in brick and mortar but was instead an association forged by blood, bravery, and sacrifice. The toughest bar in Texas was — and still is — the “Alamo Bar Association.”

The Alamo (credit: Daniel Schwen
A total of 6 lawyers perished at the Alamo in March 1836: (1) Micajah Autry; (2) Peter James Bailey; (3) James Butler Bonham; (4) Daniel William Cloud; (5) Green Berry “Ben” Jameson; and (6) William Barret Travis. They ranged in age from their early 20s to their mid-40s. Only one of their number had formally earned a law degree, two had previously been opposite each other in court, and another pair may even have been second cousins.

Each trod a unique path in their journey to the Alamo, but all earned the eternal respect of future Texans and attorneys through their shared valor.

1 comment:

Mike Hoeflich said...

Actually, there was a sixth, I believe. James S. Allen, who is listed in the exhibit as a graduate of the Transylvania Medical College was actually a graduate of Transylavnia Law School. His name is listed in the names of the class at Transylvania printed in Daniel Mayes, An Address to the Students of Law in Transylvania University (Lexington, KY., 1833), p.26.He is listed as coming from Winchester, Ky. and his "proprietor" is listed as "Hon. C. Allen."

Mike Hoeflich