Friday, October 11, 2013

Teaching Legal History: AJLH 53:4 (2013)



AMERICAN JOURNAL OF LEGAL HISTORY
Volume 53, Issue 4 (October 2013)


“TEACHING LEGAL HISTORY IN U.S. LAW SCHOOLS:  A SYMPOSIUM”

Editor’s Note

INTRODUCTION

A History of Legal History Courses Offered in American Law Schools, Joan Sidney Howland

I.  OBJECTIVES

Teaching Legal History in the First Year Curriculum, Christian G. Fritz
Teaching American Legal History in a Law School,  Peter D. Garlock
Teaching Legal History at a Small Law School, Carlton F.W. Larson
What I Do When I Teach Legal History, Stephen B. Presser
Legal History in Context, Logan Everett Sawyer III
A Legal History Course for a Christian Legal Education, Craig A. Stern

II.  TECHNIQUES

Teaching American Legal History Through Storytelling, Michael Ariens
Art and Legal History, Timothy J. Innes
Using Videos to Teach American Legal History, Catherine J. Lanctot
Legal History Through Digital Sources, Ryan Rowberry
The Fun of Teaching American Legal History, Geoffrey R. Watson

III.  DOMESTIC SUBJECT MATTERS

Conceptualizing the Evolution of Corporate Law, Amitai Aviram
An Antebellum Slave Law Colloquium,  Bryan Camp
Teaching America’s Antitrust Laws and Their Enforcement, Thomas J. Horton
Designing a Course in Judicial Biography, Mae Kuykendall
Legal History Seminar: Leading Maryland Cases, Edward C. Papenfuse and Garrett Power

IV.  FOREIGN SUBJECT MATTERS

On Teaching the History of International Law, William E. Butler
Hawaii: Pacific Crucible of American Legal History, Williamson B.C. Chang
The Multidimensional Teaching of Legal History, Peter L. Reich
Imagination and Creativity:  My History of Marriage Seminar, Charles J. Reid, Jr.
Becoming a Legal History Teacher, Jonathan Rose

V.  LAWYERING SKILLS

Teaching Legal History in the Age of Practical Legal Education, Douglas E. Abrams
Teaching Legal History Through Legal Skills,  Howard Bromberg
Using History to Teach Students How to be Lawyers, Gregory F. Jacob
Legal History:  Teaching Skills Practicing Lawyers Need, Robert M. Jarvis
The History of Contemporary Law and Policy, Molly Selvin
What the Actions of Abe Lincoln Continue to Teach Us Today, Michael J. Slinger

1 comment:

Unknown said...

Thanks, Legal History Blog, for giving notice of this issue. I should probably wait to comment until I have actually read it. But in perusing the titles of the essays, I wonder if there is not one additional "way" in which legal history could be employed to a good effect, and that is in the "continuing legal education" of PRACTICING LAWYERS.

At the Dallas Bar Association we have attempted to do that over the past six years by legal-history presentations over lunch, with about half the speakers from law schools and university history departments and the other half by lawyers who have been nurturing (slowly, since they do practice law for a living) their own historical projects. [We get them "MCLE-accredited" to encourage lawyers to come.] I am not saying our series is of the quality of NYU's legal history seminars, but you might be surprised at the level we are achieving.

So I would like to advocate legal-history education not solely for law students but also for practicing attorneys.

-Josiah Daniel
Dallas