Saturday, October 21, 2017

Weekend Roundup

  • UVA Law is digitizing "the 336 legal texts catalogued by the University librarian in 1828."  They are “part of a group of roughly 8,000 legal texts deemed critical for education in law by Thomas Jefferson.”  H/t: The Cavalier Daily.
  • The first panel at this week’s annual meeting of the ABA Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice was organized around Josh Chafetz’s Congress’s Constitution.  Quoting from the organizer Chris Walker’s post on Notice & Comment: “This timely book details the historical foundations for a number of powerful tools at Congress’s disposal—the power of the purse, the contempt power, freedom of speech and debate, and other oversight tools—to rein in the federal bureaucracy and to resolve Congress’s conflicts with the other branches of the government. This panel will discuss how Congress has used and can better utilize these tools to reassert itself in the modern administrative state.”  More.
  • We noted the Harvard Law School's Diversity and U.S. Legal History Series as it transpired during the last academic year.  The lectures are now available on the "HLS Talks" webpage
  • John A. Ferejohn, NYU Law School, has posted Financial Emergencies, “a study of the use of emergency powers to deal with financial emergencies in revolutionary France and Weimar.”
  • ICYMI: A report of a discussion after a screening of “Marshall” at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, in the Washington Post Historians explain that access to documents at Indonesia’s National Archives isn’t what it should be.
  • Update: For anyone working on the history of criminal law, the new Annual Review of Criminology has a special interdisciplinary article collection on Crime and Society. It includes articles like Malcolm Feeley and Hadar Aviram's "Social Historical Studies of Women, Crime, and Courts." Free access to the issue until Nov. 30, 2017 is available here.
Weekend Roundup is a weekly feature compiled by all the Legal History bloggers.

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