Wednesday, October 31, 2007

Halloween roundup

A few items for your holiday:

From the Trial Advocacy Blog a selected Halloween-related bibliography:

1. The Devil's Disciples: Makers of the Salem Witchcraft Trials / Peter Charles Hoffer. 1996.
2. In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 / Mary Beth Norton. 2002.
3. Salem Story: Reading the Witch Trials of 1692 / Bernard Rosenthal. 1993
4.The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: .... / Bryan F. Le Beau. 1998
5. The Salem Witch Trials : a Legal History / Peter Charles Hoffer. 1997
6. Witch-Children : From Salem Witch-Hunts to Modern Courtrooms / Hans Sebald. 1995

The Cleveland Marshall Law Library is having a Halloween research contest. Their questions include:

In Ohio, what is the maximum fine and prison sentence for the offense of abuse of a corpse? If you need a hint, look at Criminal Sentences in Ohio by the Cleveland Law Library.

"Words and Phrases" lists two bankruptcy cases defining "ghost-writing". What are the citations for these cases? (You can also find the answer on Westlaw by using the words-phrases field, but you will get three cases.)

The Wall Street Journal Law Blog has a post on the legal implications of trick-or-treating.

IntLawGrrls notes origins and traditions.

There was that well-timed review of Frankenstein: A Cultural History by Susan Tyler Hitchcock in last Sunday's Washington Post Book World.

Some outstanding Halloween dog costumes.

My personal favorite: Extreme Pumpkins from Feminist Law Professors.

And Halloween thoughts from Al Brophy, including a note on professors in costume.

This year I'm going as a legal historian with an impending final book deadline. Horrifying!
Update: Something truly terrifying: Halloween and taxes.
photo credits: pumpkin, dog.

1 comment:

Jason said...

This is unmitigated self-promotion for which I am duly aghast, but Halloween 1589 also saw the execution of an alleged "werewolf" in Germany, an occasion which marks the launch of, since there aren't enough, yet another blog: Executed Today.