Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Cromwell Foundation Fellowship Awards

[From H-Law, we have the following report of the announcement of the William Nelson Cromwell Foundation Fellows at the recently concluded annual meeting of the American Society for Legal History.]

In 2009, the William Nelson Cromwell Foundation made available a number of awards intended to support research and writing in American legal history. (The Foundation was established in 1930 to promote and encourage scholarship in legal history, particularly in the colonial and early national periods of the United States.) The number of awards to be made in any year, and their amounts, is at the discretion of the Foundation. In the past four years, the trustees of the Foundation have made three to five awards annually, in amounts up to $5,000. Preference will be given to scholars at the early stages of their careers.

The William Nelson Cromwell Foundation* makes available of a number of fellowship awards intended to support research and writing in American legal history. The number of awards to be made, and their amounts, is at the discretion of the Foundation. In the past four years, the trustees of the Foundation have made three to five awards, in amounts up to $5,000. Preference is given to scholars at the early stages of their careers. The Society's Committee for Research Fellowships and Awards reviews the applications and makes recommendations to the Foundation.

[The recipients for 2009 are:]

Kevin Arlyck, B.A. New College of Florida; M.A. The New School for Social Research; J.D. New York University School of Law; Ph.D. (candidate) New York University. Mr. Arlyck is completing a dissertation that analyzes the role of lawyers and federal courts in American foreign policy during the first decades after independence.

Mark Hanna, B.A. Yale University; Ph.D. Harvard University; Assistant Professor, The College of William & Mary. Mr. Hanna works on the law of piracy in colonial America.

Kelly Kennington, B.A. Tulane University; M.A. Duke University; Ph.D. Duke University; Post-Doctoral Fellow, School of Law, University of Wisconsin, Madison. Ms. Kennington is working on a study of slavery and freedom in antebellum America by examining lawsuits for freedom filed in the border city of St. Louis, the site of the Dred Scott case.

Felicity Turner, B.A., Monash University (Australia); M.A. LaTrobe University (Australia); Ph.D. (candidate), Duke University. Ms. Turner is in the midst of a dissertation on infanticide in the nineteenth-century United States as a way to probe the changing legal status of women and their relationship to the state.

Kyle Volk, B.A. Boston College; M.A. University of Chicago; Ph.D. University of Chicago; Assistant Professor, University of Montana, Missoula. Mr. Volk studies majority rule and minority rights in the decades before the American Civil War.

Hat tip: H-Law

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