Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Historical Perspectives on Comparative Administrative Law

I’m very pleased to be chairing a panel later this week at the 2016 Conference on Comparative Administrative Law:
Administrative Law is becoming a lively field for comparative research, and the Comparative Administrative Law Initiative at Yale Law School is partly responsible for that development. In the interest of contributing to the growth of the field, the Oscar M. Ruebhausen Fund at Yale Law School and the University of Connecticut Law School will host a conference on April 29-30, 2016 for the second edition of Comparative Administrative Law, edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman and Peter Lindseth. The new edition will include many new chapters by emerging scholars and will give broader regional coverage than the first edition. Most of the contributors to the previous edition have either revised their chapters in light of current developments or asked that their chapters be reprinted.  The website includes the program for the conference and a list of participants. As draft chapters arrive, they will be posted on the website with links on the conference program.  Anyone interested in attending the conference should contact Cathy Orcutt.
My panel is “Historical Perspectives” and consists of the following scholars and papers:
Révolution, Rechtsstaat and the Rule of Law: Historical Reflections on the Emergence of Administrative Power and Administrative Law in Europe
Bernardo Sordi

What’s in a Label? The EU as ‘Administrative’ and ‘Constitutional’
Peter Lindseth

Transformations of Administrative Law:  Italy From a Comparative Perspective
Marco D’Alberti

1 comment:

Shag from Brookline said...

Here in America the Administrative State is often challenged as an unconstitutional delegation of the powers of Congress and violative of the Constitution's separation of powers. I look forward to comparative discussions. If there were a second Constitutional Convention here in America, surely this issue would be strenuously debated.