Thursday, March 1, 2007

Diamond on Desegregation in Louisiana and Mississippi

Alfreda Sellers Diamond, Southern University Law Center, has posted a new paper, Black, White, Brown, Green, and Fordice: The Flavor of Higher Education in Louisiana and Mississippi. Here's the abstract:
Black, White, Brown, Green, and Fordice: The Flavor of Higher Education in Louisiana and Mississippi chronicles the higher education desegregation sagas in Louisiana and Mississippi. The Article specifically compares the histories of the higher education desegregation lawsuits in the two states and their subsequent experiences and progress under Settlement Agreements. The statistical populations of many universities in both states are still largely identifiable as “white” or “black,” and so the Article poses questions not only respecting the implementation of United States v. Fordice in both states, but also respecting the value, desirability, or possibility of the “integrative ideal” converting “black schools” and “white schools” to “just schools.”

1 comment:

neal said...

The Narragansett Indians were the first inhabitants of Block Island as evidenced by remains that date back thousands of years.technique for managing items in a memory store. A “free-space size threshold” is set for the memory store. An age parameter is also set.
-------------
jnny

Louisiana Drug Addiction