Thursday, September 6, 2007

Shelton, An Introduction to the History of International Human Rights Law

Dinah L. Shelton, George Washington University, has posted a new essay, An Introduction to the History of International Human Rights Law. Here's the abstract:
As part of a lecture series given at the International Institute of Human Rights, in Strasbourg, France, in July 2003, the author presents an overview of the history of international human rights law. The author explores numerous religious, political, cultural, philosophical, economic and intellectual movements throughout history that have informed and guided the development of human rights law on the global stage. In doing so, the author examines the moral and ethical dimensions which underpin international human rights law, including what she defines as the innate human desire for protection from abuse. The author highlights the world's most significant historical events and people who have influenced modern concepts of human rights law. Despite the many successes of the human rights movement, the author draws attention to international institutions established to protect human rights, which are often too weak to address many contemporary human rights violations and atrocities occurring in failed states or at the hands of non-state actors. As this area of international law continues to develop, these shortcomings must be addressed if human rights progress is to continue.

2 comments:

jawats said...

I am somewhat suprised that Ms. Shelton so easily jumps from Roman times to early modern, ignoring important contributions and discussions to individual rights from 100 A.D. onwards. Surely, she mentions Christian theological discussion, but to ignore the ius commune and the development of rights prior to 1648 seems almost willful.

--Jonathan Watson

jawats said...

Should have been "seems almost willful and deliberate".

--Jonathan Watson