Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Law & Hist. Rev. (May 2012): Book Reviews

Following up on our coverage of the articles in the latest issue of the Law & History Review, we are now spotlighting the book reviews. Here's what you'll find in the May 2012 issue:
Ken I. Kersch reviews David E. Bernstein, Rehabilitating Lochner: Defending Individual Rights Against Progressive Reform (University of Chicago Press).
Roman J. Hoyos reviews Christian Fritz, American Sovereigns: The American Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War (Cambridge University Press).

Stephen Siegel reviews Kunal M. Parker, Common Law, History, and Democracy in America, 1790–1900: Legal Thought before Modernism (Cambridge University Press).

Carole Hough reviews Lisi Oliver, The Body Legal in Barbarian Law (University of Toronto Press).

Brigitte Miriam Bedos-Rezak reviews Talya Fishman, Becoming the People of the Talmud: Oral Torah as Written Tradition in Medieval Jewish Cultures (University of Pennsylvania Press).


Walter F. Pratt reviews Kevin Costello, The Court of Admiralty of Ireland, 1575–1893 (Four Courts Press).

Christian Promitzer reviews Svetla Baloutzova, Demography and Nation: Social Legislation and Population Policy in Bulgaria, 1918–1944 (CEU Press Studies in the History of Medicine, vol. I) (Central European University Press).

Peter H. Solomon reviews Norman M. Naimark, Stalin's Genocides (Princeton University Press).

Paul D. Halliday reviews Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Yale University Press).

Paul Gregory reviews Steven A. Barnes, Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society (Princeton University Press).

Anthony J. Steinhoff reviews Klaus-Gert Lutterbeck, Politische Ideengeschichte als Geschichte administrativer Praxis. Konzeptionen vom Gemeinwesen im Verwaltungshandeln der Stadt Straßburg/Strasbourg 1800–1914 (Vittorio Klostermann).

Helle Vogt reviews Per Andersen, Legal Procedure and Practice in Medieval Denmark (Brill).

Keith M. Baker reviews Emma Rothschild, The Inner Life of Empires: An Eighteenth-Century History (Princeton University Press).
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